What’s On… Tenth Avenue? (between 24th and 25th Streets)

What’s On… 10th Avenue? (between 24th and 25th Streets)
Chelsea

BY CAROLYN ONOFREY

With such a close proximity to the London Terrace apartments – a full block of almost 1,000 apartments opened in 1930 featuring a private 1 acre garden and an indoor pool- 10th Avenue between 24th and 25th Streets has long been a bustling neighborhood of its own.  The Chelsea gallery scene as well as the opening of the Highline in 2009, has begun to transform this neighborhood even further from a once, mostly industrial area to a warm, thriving community.  Restaurant stops, especially on this block have a pleasant familiar feel due to the high sense of pride residents exude in their neighborhood, making everyone feel welcome.

242 10th Avenue – Trestle on Tenth
Stop by Trestle on Tenth for a relaxing brunch before hitting the highline or visiting the many art galleries in the area.  Chef Ralf Kuettel  imparts his personality into the menu, offering a refreshing alternative to the standard eggs Benedict brunch. Get a seat in the charming back garden – just don’t make Trestle on Tenth your choice if you’re in a hurry as service tends to lean toward the relaxed European side of the menu!

Trestle on Tenth on Urbanspoon

 246 10th Avenue – Bottino Takeout
A takeout annex of our next stop on 10th Avenue, Bottino.  It’s a staple for those who work in the galleries for a lunchtime salad or sandwich.  Grab one of their freshly made sandwiches if you’re in the area and head for the Highline to dine in style!

248 10th Avenue – Bottino
The airy Bottino dining room is the perfect post-gallery hopping spot to enjoy classic Italian fare.  Although basic, the menu sports something for everyone and most agree Bottino is a solid find where art galleries reign supreme.
Bottino on Urbanspoon

250 10th Avenue - Subway
If you’re not in the mood for a fresh sandwich from Bottino, or just short on cash, stop by this Subway locale for the sandwich that made Jared famous!

252 10th Avenue – Smoke Shop
Not much more than your average bodega, Smoke Shop offers all the necessities plus a nice selection of magazines!

 

Fusilli @ Pepe Giallo

253 10th Avenue – Pepe Giallo
Families with young children feel comfortable at this neighborhood spot that’s always crowded due to its reasonable pricing and something-for-everyone menu.  The portions are large and the outdoor garden can’t be missed, but if it’s being waited on you want – try your luck elsewhere.

Pepe Giallo on Urbanspoon

254 10th Avenue – Chop-Shop
This brand new Chop-Shop (so new it’s barely on the map!)  features gourmet Thai fare.  While a liquor license is still currently in the works, the minimalist atmosphere is certainly a pleasant place for an under-the-radar type of date – just make sure you head there before everyone else finds out about it!

 

Chop-Shop
Chop Shop on Urbanspoon

256 10th Avenue – 10th Avenue Pizza
A neighborhood standby, 10th Avenue Pizza has been delivering hot slices (gyros, sandwiches, and breakfast) for as long as most anyone in the neighborhood can remember.  Regulars tout the service is great and the prices superb, however food can be hit or miss.
10th Avenue Pizza & Deli on Urbanspoon

What’s On…Chrystie Street? (Part 2)

BY CAROLYN ONOFREY


The northern half of Chrystie gives way to a Whole Foods and a swank new apartment complex near where it intersects Houston Street. It is also the site of the Chrystie Street connection, a major subway connection and the first and only section of the Second Avenue subway line to be completed to date; evidence that there is no stopping the gentrification as it makes its way down Chrystie. Visit Chrystie while there are still reminders of why we love the Lower East Side and Chinatown!

Tenderloin steak at Sammy’s

157 Chrystie Street – Sammy’s Roumanian
It’s hard not to have fun at Sammy’s, an old school Jewish joint that never gets old whether you’ve just discovered it or have been going since the 80s. You’ll feel like you’re at your best friend’s Bar Mitzvah each and every time, so get ready to get up, get dancing, and pour on the schmaltz!

Tenderloin steak at Sammy’s

161 Chrystie Street – Dixon Place
Part Lounge, part performance space – Dixon Place has been catering to the performance art scene since the 80s, though this particular location has only been opened since 2008. Come with an open mind to support the budding talent and get comfortable, because you’ll never know quite what to expect here.

Sammy's Roumanian Steakhouse on Urbanspoon
167 Chrystie Street – New Beer Distributors
New Beer Distributors has one of the largest selections of beer for retail sale in the city, along with a few taps so you can take a growler away. Pick up a frequent growler customer card and get rewarded for your beer purchases!

189 Chrystie Street – The Box
One of the most raucous shows in the city, The Box puts on vaudeville-esque shows for the 21st century New Yorker whose unsurpassed shock tolerance may just be surpassed here. Reserving a table can get pricey and the door is tough without one, but most agree The Box is a must at least once in this lifetime for a late night romp.

191 Chrystie Street, 2F – Freemans
While the address says Chrystie, look instead for Freemans at the end of Freeman Alley off of Rivington. This trendy traditional American restaurant focuses on local produce and meat paired with excellent small batch spirits. Stop by for their quieter weekend brunch for a feel of ‘Old New York’ while noshing on some classics like their hot artichoke dip or smoked trout.
Freemans on Urbanspoon


203 Chrystie Street – Neuman’s
One of New York’s premier catering services, Neuman’s, calls Chrystie home. Top quality service, food, and presentation at reasonable rates has made Neuman’s a standout among the many caterers in New York for over 30 years.

229 Chrystie Street – Subway
The Subway chain of restaurants was established in 1965 in Bridgeport, CT by a 17 year old boy as a way to make money to pay for his college education. Nearly 50 years later the company boasts more than 34,000 locations around the world, making it the #3 largest chain restaurant.

 

What’s on Stone St.?

BY CAROLYN ONOFREY

What’s On… Stone Street? (Between Williams and Pearl)

Financial District

 

Photo by Carolyn Onofrey


Approaching the alleyway we now know as Stone Street around quitting time on any day when the weather is nice enough to enjoy from outside, you will find suited men and women in droves scattered about the car-less cobble-stoned street. Picnic tables crowd the first “paved” street in Manhattan and for the first time in about a hundred years Stone Street is once again a bustling haven.  In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Stone Street flourished from the maritime business that the nearby port created, but over the next 150 years the street became abandoned and dilapidated and in 1980 was even completely taken off the map and relocated to what we now know as South William Street.  It wasn’t until 1996 when the street was reopened and declared a historic district.  Now, you can find a global selection of restaurants and pubs making Stone Street a can’t miss destination for both tourists and locals alike.
Burger Burger Pick-Up Window (77 Pearl Street). One, in a series of new burger joints popping up in the Financial District, Burger Burger is best suited if you’re craving a lunchtime burger. The lack of seating and otherwise take out style décor doesn’t bother the lunchtime crowd because there are a slew of parks in the area to enjoy your burger in.  Although some quip that it isn’t the best burger in the neighborhood, the sweet potato fries are worth a try.

Burger Burger on Urbanspoon
45 Stone Street – The Dubliner
As your average Irish pub- The Dubliner does its job by getting its patrons nice and loose in a raucous atmosphere.  Stop by for a perfectly poured pint of Guinness and enjoy inside the sprawling 2 story space or outside on Stone Street.

79 Pearl Street – Waterstone GrillWith a back entrance on Stone Street Waterstone Grill may get more traffic than it should with and uninspiring menu aimed to please however reasonable the prices may be.  The look is slightly more upscale than most on Stone Street, but for most it doesn’t impress.

Stone Street Tavern on Urbanspoon

 

 

A quaint Stone Street - Photo by Carolyn Onofrey

81 Pearl Street – Becketts

If you’re in the Financial District and a jam-packed sports bar is the name of your game, then Beckett’s is the place for you.  Drinks and food can add up quickly, but the feeling that Beckett’s doesn’t try to be something it’s not leaves regulars and first timers alike at ease and coming back for more.

52 Stone Street – Stone Street Tavern

Brunch or drinks are your best bet at Stone Street Tavern with a beer list to keep most satiated.  The cozy interior is inviting and tops the list of many who work in the area as the perfect place for an after work pint or quick bite to eat.  Try the brunch for a selection of just about anything your mood desires.

 

Brunch at Smorgas Chef

53 Stone Street – Smorgas Chef
Serving Scandinavian fare by a Scandinavian staff, this Manhattan 3some (with locations in the West Village and on Park Avenue) fills the bill if salmon and caviar are what’s on your mind.  Try the weekend brunch, when a quiet Stone Street makes this a diamond in the not-so rough.

17 South William Street – Crepes Du Nord
The official address may be on South William, but with an entrance through the afore mentioned Smorgas Chef, Crepes Du Nord gets a spot on the Stone Street ‘What’s On…?’.  Sweet and savory crepes litter the menu with a Scandinavian flair.  Try the Crepe Complete for a savory brunch fix.

Crepes du Nord on Urbanspoon

 

 

Serious eats at Adrienne’s – Photo courtesy of Lunch Studio

54 Stone Street – Adrienne’s Pizza Bar

Adrienne’s Pizza Bar is truly a pizza parlor in a wine bar.  This classy spot is a great place to take a date that’s sure to impress.  Regulars say the old fashioned pan pizza is the only way to go, with its thin, yet bready crust and top notch toppings.  You’ll spend a little more (read: about $30) for a pizza here but you certainly won’t mind once you bite into Adrienne’s unique pie.

Gourmet pizza meets wine bar, why didn’t anyone else think of this?

 

Serious eats at Adrienne’s – Photo courtesy of Lunch Studio

83 Pearl Street – Mad Dog & Beans

If you’re on Stone Street and not craving pub fare or pizza, Mad Dog is the place to go.  This Mexican spot is pricey (though many say worth it), but most just go for the margaritas.

Mad Dog and Beans on Urbanspoon

 

57 Stone Street – Vintry Wine & Whiskey

Vintry Wine & Whiskey does just that – wine and whiskey.  With a tremendous whiskey and well rounded wine selection, Vintry is a great spot to take the wine or whiskey connoisseur. One or two ounce pours for the hard stuff and two or five ounce pours for wine make this a true tasting experience.  Order a few of the small plate options and you have a great night ahead of yourself!

Vintry Wine & Whiskey on Urbanspoon

95 Pearl Street – Ulysses’
Although the official address is on Pearl Street, most know Ulysses’ for its rear entrance on the cobble-stoned street where outdoor tables fill the roadway.  Ulysses’ has a good selection of beer from around the world and an impressive list of whiskey to choose from.  Ulysses’ also sports a full menu with raw bar and a weekend brunch with can’t-miss $5 cocktails.  Try the Bloody Maureen for a meal in itself – Bloody Mary mix and Guinness garnished with bacon and a hunk of Guinness marbled bleu cheese!

Ulysses on Urbanspoon

Photo by Carolyn Onofrey

62 Stone Street – Financier

This Financial District mini-chain since 2002 has been serving fine coffee and pastries to everyone and anyone who craves these affluent nibbles.  Financier carries a full line of French dessert options as well as a substantial breakfast and lunch menu.  Loyal followers say their coffee (served with a little treat on the side) can’t be beat!

 

Waterstone Grill on Urbanspoon

Waterstone Grill on Urbanspoon

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What's on Stone St.?

BY CAROLYN ONOFREY

What’s On… Stone Street? (Between Williams and Pearl)

Financial District

 

Photo by Carolyn Onofrey


Approaching the alleyway we now know as Stone Street around quitting time on any day when the weather is nice enough to enjoy from outside, you will find suited men and women in droves scattered about the car-less cobble-stoned street. Picnic tables crowd the first “paved” street in Manhattan and for the first time in about a hundred years Stone Street is once again a bustling haven.  In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Stone Street flourished from the maritime business that the nearby port created, but over the next 150 years the street became abandoned and dilapidated and in 1980 was even completely taken off the map and relocated to what we now know as South William Street.  It wasn’t until 1996 when the street was reopened and declared a historic district.  Now, you can find a global selection of restaurants and pubs making Stone Street a can’t miss destination for both tourists and locals alike.
Burger Burger Pick-Up Window (77 Pearl Street). One, in a series of new burger joints popping up in the Financial District, Burger Burger is best suited if you’re craving a lunchtime burger. The lack of seating and otherwise take out style décor doesn’t bother the lunchtime crowd because there are a slew of parks in the area to enjoy your burger in.  Although some quip that it isn’t the best burger in the neighborhood, the sweet potato fries are worth a try.

Burger Burger on Urbanspoon
45 Stone Street – The Dubliner
As your average Irish pub- The Dubliner does its job by getting its patrons nice and loose in a raucous atmosphere.  Stop by for a perfectly poured pint of Guinness and enjoy inside the sprawling 2 story space or outside on Stone Street.

79 Pearl Street – Waterstone GrillWith a back entrance on Stone Street Waterstone Grill may get more traffic than it should with and uninspiring menu aimed to please however reasonable the prices may be.  The look is slightly more upscale than most on Stone Street, but for most it doesn’t impress.

Stone Street Tavern on Urbanspoon

 

 

A quaint Stone Street - Photo by Carolyn Onofrey

81 Pearl Street – Becketts

If you’re in the Financial District and a jam-packed sports bar is the name of your game, then Beckett’s is the place for you.  Drinks and food can add up quickly, but the feeling that Beckett’s doesn’t try to be something it’s not leaves regulars and first timers alike at ease and coming back for more.

52 Stone Street – Stone Street Tavern

Brunch or drinks are your best bet at Stone Street Tavern with a beer list to keep most satiated.  The cozy interior is inviting and tops the list of many who work in the area as the perfect place for an after work pint or quick bite to eat.  Try the brunch for a selection of just about anything your mood desires.

 

Brunch at Smorgas Chef

53 Stone Street – Smorgas Chef
Serving Scandinavian fare by a Scandinavian staff, this Manhattan 3some (with locations in the West Village and on Park Avenue) fills the bill if salmon and caviar are what’s on your mind.  Try the weekend brunch, when a quiet Stone Street makes this a diamond in the not-so rough.

17 South William Street – Crepes Du Nord
The official address may be on South William, but with an entrance through the afore mentioned Smorgas Chef, Crepes Du Nord gets a spot on the Stone Street ‘What’s On…?’.  Sweet and savory crepes litter the menu with a Scandinavian flair.  Try the Crepe Complete for a savory brunch fix.

Crepes du Nord on Urbanspoon

 

 

Serious eats at Adrienne’s – Photo courtesy of Lunch Studio

54 Stone Street – Adrienne’s Pizza Bar

Adrienne’s Pizza Bar is truly a pizza parlor in a wine bar.  This classy spot is a great place to take a date that’s sure to impress.  Regulars say the old fashioned pan pizza is the only way to go, with its thin, yet bready crust and top notch toppings.  You’ll spend a little more (read: about $30) for a pizza here but you certainly won’t mind once you bite into Adrienne’s unique pie.

Gourmet pizza meets wine bar, why didn’t anyone else think of this?

 

Serious eats at Adrienne’s – Photo courtesy of Lunch Studio

83 Pearl Street – Mad Dog & Beans

If you’re on Stone Street and not craving pub fare or pizza, Mad Dog is the place to go.  This Mexican spot is pricey (though many say worth it), but most just go for the margaritas.

Mad Dog and Beans on Urbanspoon

 

57 Stone Street – Vintry Wine & Whiskey

Vintry Wine & Whiskey does just that – wine and whiskey.  With a tremendous whiskey and well rounded wine selection, Vintry is a great spot to take the wine or whiskey connoisseur. One or two ounce pours for the hard stuff and two or five ounce pours for wine make this a true tasting experience.  Order a few of the small plate options and you have a great night ahead of yourself!

Vintry Wine & Whiskey on Urbanspoon

95 Pearl Street – Ulysses’
Although the official address is on Pearl Street, most know Ulysses’ for its rear entrance on the cobble-stoned street where outdoor tables fill the roadway.  Ulysses’ has a good selection of beer from around the world and an impressive list of whiskey to choose from.  Ulysses’ also sports a full menu with raw bar and a weekend brunch with can’t-miss $5 cocktails.  Try the Bloody Maureen for a meal in itself – Bloody Mary mix and Guinness garnished with bacon and a hunk of Guinness marbled bleu cheese!

Ulysses on Urbanspoon

Photo by Carolyn Onofrey

62 Stone Street – Financier

This Financial District mini-chain since 2002 has been serving fine coffee and pastries to everyone and anyone who craves these affluent nibbles.  Financier carries a full line of French dessert options as well as a substantial breakfast and lunch menu.  Loyal followers say their coffee (served with a little treat on the side) can’t be beat!

 

Waterstone Grill on Urbanspoon

Waterstone Grill on Urbanspoon

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