Home of Manhattan’s Best Banh Mi Sandwich – Review of Sao Mai

BY ELENA MANCINI

203 First Ave.
East Village
(212) 358-8880 / Sao Mai 

East of the East Village bustle and trendiness, this family-run East Village Vietnamese restaurant serves traditional Vietnamese fare and the best Banh Mi Sandwiches on the Manhattan side of the East River.

Vegetarian Bahn Mi

Available in six varieties including pho, sliced pork, grilled chicken and vegetarian, these sandwiches make a quick, nutritious, flavor-packed meal that’s easy on the wallet (priced between $6-$7). The Bahn Mi are prepared on baguettes are consistently fresh and crusty with a soft and chewy middle. Independent of the filling you choose, the kitchen always strikes the right balance between bread and ingredients. Their vegetarian Bahn Mi is among my favorite comfort-food lunches. Prepared on two warm halves of choice baguette, they’re stuffed with toothsome strands of sauteed bok choy, straw mushrooms, seedless cucumbers, shredded carrot and abundant swaths of cilantro, the sandwiches and seasoned with lemongrass,  sriracha mayonnaise, that provides a subtle and reverberating pitch of complex heat. In sum, it’s a light, filling lunch that delivers high-flavor rewards.

Pho’ Sao Mai

Front: Summer Rolls; Far: Spring Rolls

Lest one think Sao Mi is just about Bahn Mi, flavor mavens and fans of traditional Vietnamese fare will find other  sections of its menu will prove well worth exploring. The Pho Sao Mai will not disappoint. A flavorful broth, rich in tender strips of brisket, sprouts, rice noodles and a medley of herbs will consistently hit the spot. Adding appeal to  Sao Mi’s attractions is its steal of a lunch menu, which includes the choice of an appetizer, entree and a soft drink, all for $10. Sweetening things further,  both the Bahn Mi and the Pho are included in this deal!

Ga Gary – Chicken Curry

With a wide variety of vegetarian options on its menu, Sao Mai is also a smart choice for a low-key dinner that guarantees value, quality and flavor. Pity that wait staff has not yet mastered the walk-in dinner crowd on weekends. During these times, the  friendly service  can turn into a source of frustration for those who do not suffer extended waits and uneven food delivery times lightly.

Sao Mai on Urbanspoon

What’s On… Tenth Avenue? (between 24th and 25th Streets)

What’s On… 10th Avenue? (between 24th and 25th Streets)
Chelsea

BY CAROLYN ONOFREY

With such a close proximity to the London Terrace apartments – a full block of almost 1,000 apartments opened in 1930 featuring a private 1 acre garden and an indoor pool- 10th Avenue between 24th and 25th Streets has long been a bustling neighborhood of its own.  The Chelsea gallery scene as well as the opening of the Highline in 2009, has begun to transform this neighborhood even further from a once, mostly industrial area to a warm, thriving community.  Restaurant stops, especially on this block have a pleasant familiar feel due to the high sense of pride residents exude in their neighborhood, making everyone feel welcome.

242 10th Avenue – Trestle on Tenth
Stop by Trestle on Tenth for a relaxing brunch before hitting the highline or visiting the many art galleries in the area.  Chef Ralf Kuettel  imparts his personality into the menu, offering a refreshing alternative to the standard eggs Benedict brunch. Get a seat in the charming back garden – just don’t make Trestle on Tenth your choice if you’re in a hurry as service tends to lean toward the relaxed European side of the menu!

Trestle on Tenth on Urbanspoon

 246 10th Avenue – Bottino Takeout
A takeout annex of our next stop on 10th Avenue, Bottino.  It’s a staple for those who work in the galleries for a lunchtime salad or sandwich.  Grab one of their freshly made sandwiches if you’re in the area and head for the Highline to dine in style!

248 10th Avenue – Bottino
The airy Bottino dining room is the perfect post-gallery hopping spot to enjoy classic Italian fare.  Although basic, the menu sports something for everyone and most agree Bottino is a solid find where art galleries reign supreme.
Bottino on Urbanspoon

250 10th Avenue - Subway
If you’re not in the mood for a fresh sandwich from Bottino, or just short on cash, stop by this Subway locale for the sandwich that made Jared famous!

252 10th Avenue – Smoke Shop
Not much more than your average bodega, Smoke Shop offers all the necessities plus a nice selection of magazines!

 

Fusilli @ Pepe Giallo

253 10th Avenue – Pepe Giallo
Families with young children feel comfortable at this neighborhood spot that’s always crowded due to its reasonable pricing and something-for-everyone menu.  The portions are large and the outdoor garden can’t be missed, but if it’s being waited on you want – try your luck elsewhere.

Pepe Giallo on Urbanspoon

254 10th Avenue – Chop-Shop
This brand new Chop-Shop (so new it’s barely on the map!)  features gourmet Thai fare.  While a liquor license is still currently in the works, the minimalist atmosphere is certainly a pleasant place for an under-the-radar type of date – just make sure you head there before everyone else finds out about it!

 

Chop-Shop
Chop Shop on Urbanspoon

256 10th Avenue – 10th Avenue Pizza
A neighborhood standby, 10th Avenue Pizza has been delivering hot slices (gyros, sandwiches, and breakfast) for as long as most anyone in the neighborhood can remember.  Regulars tout the service is great and the prices superb, however food can be hit or miss.
10th Avenue Pizza & Deli on Urbanspoon

Upclose with Celebrity Chef Curtis Stone and Why The Big Apple’s Local Dishes Are the Best

Hotel Indigo Invites NYC Locals to Meet Celebrity Chef Curtis Stone and Prove The Big Apple’s Local Dishes Are the Best – Friday, September 30, 2011

EVENT REVIEW & INTERVIEW BY CLAIRE McCURDY

Chef Curtis Stone at Dish on the Dish at Hotel Indigo, NYC

The Hotel Indigo was clearly having a bountiful foodie afternoon. The stream of black-clad New York foodies eddied in and out. The ladies in black and white uniforms with trays of little tiny edibles like a wicked maguro roll with dipping sauce cunningly concealed in the bottom of a tiny cup, or a tiny crème brule garnished with an even tinier mint leaf and seated on a red pomegranate base, efficiently made the rounds. The buzz of conversation and appreciation rose.

Displays of local delicacies– from the five boroughs—were mounted around the room. A magnificent Brooklyn bakery, Brooklyn Bread Guy, Inc., with an amazingly wide variety of breads, rolls, baguettes, was posed next to an importer of olive oils so that one could rip off a chunk of fluffy baguette and dunk it into the olive oil seated at the adjacent table and savor both.  Tumbadour chocolates, also from Brooklyn, created by pastry cook Jean Francois Bonnet, (formerly of Daniel Restaurant) were cunningly decorated to display their contents – an abstract swirl of lime for a lime scented chocolate, for example.  They inspired broad smiles in anyone who came to their table, and everyone did.   A Double Cross Pear Martini made with Double Cross Vodka from Slovakia, the delicious garnish of a Chilean Wild Baby Peach, and wild baby pear juice, was amazing, the juice masking the strength of the vodka.

But all of this was merely the introduction. The star of the day and the event was Chef Curtis Stone, Australian super chef, and star not only of the cutting board in Australia, Britain and the US, but also a media darling.

Described variously as an important ’young gun” chef and by People Magazine (to his stated embarrassment) as “one of the sexiest men alive,” Curtis describes himself endearingly as a kid learning about making delicious meals from his mother and grandmother. He said that family and food were a close association with him. And was it not true that most people, when asked what was the best food they could ever remember, was a dish their mother had cooked?  It was certainly true for him.  A cherished memory, family sitting around the table, eating food cooked especially for the occasion, and the meal featuring his mother’s bread—she is a baker. Curtis likes to bake bread from her recipes.  “Good food,” he said, “has that personal touch.”

I asked him if he had a philosophy of food.  He said that a great meal starts with really great fresh ingredients.  Go looking for the perfect local fresh cheese, meats, vegetables–that’s what he wants to have end up, cooked perfectly, at the dinner table.  And remember the cooking timelines of each food element in order to put together your total timetable for cooking the meal. So that the timing of the cooking all works together.

Curtis has said that he loves soaking up local cultures as he travels, so I asked what was his favorite cuisine. He said that French cuisine would have to be at or near the top of his list. That they used their beautiful local produce and products to create brilliant, flavorsome exquisite meals and had been honing their techniques for hundreds of years—to perfection. And that their elegant foods are an integral part of their culture.

Did he have a signature meal? Curtis commented that as one got to know the history of food one learned about certain striking spots – such as Liguria in Italy- the birthplace of pesto.  The name means “pounded.”   Pesto is the pungent, aromatic, brilliant mixture of garlic, basil, and pine nuts pounded together and blended with olive oil and Parmigiano Reggiano.  He said that one could really get a feel for the wonderful taste of squashed mashed young basil leaves.  That it was very important to use young basil leaves.  Then the pesto will be powerful and delicious.

Curtis reluctantly acknowledged that he has become a media darling but insists that it was all by accident.  He said he started with a number of segments, (Oprah, Ellen) during which he worked hard to share his love of food, and that it just caught on. People love food! And they love hearing other people talking well about food!

Who was his favorite talk show host? Curtis adroitly dodged that one, saying that Al Roker comes backstage frequently to sample his wares even when he isn’t on the show, and that he loves Curtis’s cooking.

His advice to a new chef just starting out?  Think of assembling your meal as a Sherlock Holmes or treasure hunt experience.  You start with great fresh local ingredients and then start asking questions about them. And going on a hunt for ingredients which will complement the first element.  Find a great bunch of asparagus—then ask, what goes well with this? A beautiful prosciutto? Then what?   Keep building on those initial blocks and you will have assembled the pieces to a beautiful meal.

When I asked Curtis what he felt was the key to success in his restaurants, he said that he always strove for integrity.  He said that a chef and restaurant owner must love his customers and must care for them and their needs from the minute they walk through the door. The chef’s warm attitude must be consistent throughout their time in the restaurant. Love- that’s the key!

And the perfect note on which to end the conversation.  Curtis had served us the dessert, you might say, and the fine cup of coffee

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What’s On… West 26th Street (between 6th and 7th Avenue)

BY CAROLYN ONOFREY

Photo courtesy of hotelchatter.com

Chelsea, NYC

In an area between the Fashion Institute of Technology and nameless high rises – where the grubby wholesale junk shops of 6th Avenue are just steps away lies the surprisingly happening block of West 26th street between 6th and 7th Avenues.  It has only recently become the hub it is in recent years.  The garment district has steadily seen a decrease in area since its heyday – around the turn of the century, when this block housed one of the first garment workshops in the area.  Now, the only thing that remains of the garment industry is the home for the garment workers union which lies at the corner of 26th street and 7th avenue in the Lefcourt Clothing Center Building.

122 West 26th Street – The Ainsworth
Outfitted with more TVs than you can handle, this sports bar in Chelsea is much more than just a sports bar.  The space is reminiscent of a ski lodge complete with tasteful Evergreen shrubbery and rustic chandeliers and offers a full dining area (within view of the TVs, of course).  Curious menu items like the Peking Duck Burrito and a goat cheese stuffed lamb burger make this place a cut, or two above your average pub.

 

Goat cheese and lamb burger at Ainsworth

125 West 26th Street – Prime Cafe @ the Holiday Inn
Reserved mostly for guests of the hotel; Prime Cafe serves 3 meals a day and comes complete with an expectedly sleepy hotel bar. The scene is livelier during warm weather due to a good happy hour and street front outdoor seating. The Italian food served at dinner time is a surprising treat for those who stumble in.

Outdoor patio at Prime Café

127 West 26th Street – Black Door
Opened in 2002 when this stretch of 26th Street was still a sleepy one, Black Door was able to stay under the radar until recently.  Best suited as a less rowdy, more grown up after work option, Black Door is low-key go-to if you’re in the area, but may not be worth it if you stop by on an especially crowded night.

128 West 26th Street – Tre Dici

An option for the older set in the area, filled with 50 and 60 somethings – this very grown up, romantic Italian is best enjoyed if a reservation is made for the more inspiring (read: younger) second floor steakhouse.  Speakeasy style, as is the trend these days – walk down the second floor hallway to an unmarked door and enter the New Orleans inspired space for a solid selection of reasonably priced steaks and homemade pastas.

Window display at Burgundy Wine

143 West 26th Street – Burgundy Wine

Burgundy wine holds nightly tastings and wine events complete with live music for an all around good wine-store experience.  Focusing mainly on wines from the Burgundy region of France this is definitely a niche store and great if its French wine you’re looking for.

152 West 26th Street – Rare Grill
For a modern, slightly upscale but nothing super special take on the burger joint, Rare Grill is your answer.  If you’re in the area, or staying at the Fashion 26 Hotel, which it shares an entrance with the restaurant Rare Grill is a solid option.

 

Sliders at Rare Grill

152 West 26th Street – Rare View
Rare Grill’s answer to the rooftop bar, Rare View is a perfect place to meet a group and have a few of their signature fruity cocktails while admiring the view of the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings.  Located on the 16th floor of the Fashion 26 Hotel and done up, floor to ceiling in beachy wood planks Rare View is a rare treat in the city.

Tillman’s

165 West 26th Street – Tillman’s
Bringing some soul to Chelsea, Tillman’s features live music and DJs most nights.  A food menu features their gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches inspired by soul and comfort foods.  Some say the scene isn’t worth it, but it’s definitely closer for most than traveling to Harlem.

165 West 26th Street – B & B
Although decor is non-existent at this African-American buffet style hole in the wall, you won’t walk away hungry or dissatisfied.  Selections include curried rice and meat dishes to collard greens and plantains.  Don’t let your surroundings fool you, this place is good to the last drop, and you WILL be eating to the very last drop.

175 West 26th Street – Subway
This Subway franchise is a tiny hole in the wall, but does the trick if you’re in the mood for one of their signature sub sandwiches!

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Tillman's Bar & Lounge on Urbanspoon

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Keeping things pretty much the same – Review of Peter Mcmanus Cafe’

BY CLAIRE McCURDY

Peter McManus Café is actually a bar—a Chelsea bar’s bar.   Iconic.  Owned and operated by four generations of the McManus family.  A place so sure of itself that it has only recently put up a Facebook page, generally relying on word of mouth from the four generations of satisfied customers. . Burnished long deep brown bar, cut glass mirrors behind the bar, bright green banquette tables and a beer and food menu which changes very slowly if at all- we are talking generations here. It is a dark cave of a place which warmly beckons to all.

Courtesy of http://greenwichvillagenydailyphoto.blogspot.com/2009/04/peter-mcmanus-cafe.html

Peter McManus Café has been a fixture in the neighborhood since1936.  And it continues to draw a crowd of neighborhood folks and auslanders alike from a pack of sharp young lawyers to aging/or aged hippies in overalls, to firemen, or contractors on a neighborhood job, to the odd barfly maintaining a seat on a stool with a certain amount of difficulty.  There are a few women, too, especially at night (read: after 6:00) when bright color and glamour and some intense flirtations enter the bar; but during the day, it seems to be province of men. The place even hosts the out of the way casual customers on their way to the Chelsea galleries, or to the trendy thrift shops in the west 20’s.

The bartender today is a guy whose bushy gray beard and moustache cover the bulk of his face, but he is as warm and genial as his many clean shaven predecessors—probably his father and grandfather.  Joking with everybody, he and his remarks bring snorts and bellows of laughter down the bar even to the corner table where I sit.  The bartender even manages to extend a helping hand to the tippling barfly while pulling generous pints of beer.

McManus does serve mixed drinks, but I saw very few tiny little umbrellas or pink monkeys depending from a glass.  The mixed drinks are very much an afterthought to the fine beer menu which is as long as your arm and begins but does not end with Guinness.  I had a wonderful black and tan- Guinness with lager, which if poured correctly spills into an even split of half black Guinness, half warm golden lager and when you drink it, the two flavors mingle on the tongue.

There’s food, but no fancy chic fusion stuff- –  good basic decent burgers which won applause from my dining companion,  (the chiliburgers are legendary), a giant pile of steak-cut fries, , a few salads which are surprisingly varied and tasty for a meat and potatoes kind of place, and my personal fave, the fennel scented knockwurst and sauerkraut. Smothered with mustard, it was a meal so hearty that I was not hungry until some twelve hours later.

To history starved New Yorkers a bar/restaurant which has survived longer than a season is a rarity; four generations, outstanding and virtually unique.  The bar’s history can be read from its walls.   I sat under a large McManus portrait and at my left hand a foldout picture of Company D, 130th Infantry, where if one could just pick him out was doubtless James J. McManus. No date, but clearly World War II.—we know he served in the Philippines and won two Purple Hearts. I also sat directly in front of a TV playing the Food Channel, tear stained contestants slicing and dicing, running on a loop; and a flashing automated red menu announcing the much touted Goose Island Summer beer. Nostalgia, chic collations, trendy seasonal beer:  All one’s needs taken care of.

Before we left, completely sated, we wanted to check one small niggling detail.  Could the banquette have been covered with red plastic last time we were here? Instead of the current green?  We asked our friendly and convivial waitress..  She sternly told us that nothing of the sort had happened or, would ever happen is she had anything to say about it.  “We don’t change anything much around here at Peter McManus. We like things to stay pretty much the same.”

How could we argue?  A steady port in an unsteady changing world. We felt exactly the same way.

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Peter McManus Café on Urbanspoon

Keeping things pretty much the same – Review of Peter Mcmanus Cafe'

BY CLAIRE McCURDY

Peter McManus Café is actually a bar—a Chelsea bar’s bar.   Iconic.  Owned and operated by four generations of the McManus family.  A place so sure of itself that it has only recently put up a Facebook page, generally relying on word of mouth from the four generations of satisfied customers. . Burnished long deep brown bar, cut glass mirrors behind the bar, bright green banquette tables and a beer and food menu which changes very slowly if at all- we are talking generations here. It is a dark cave of a place which warmly beckons to all.

Courtesy of http://greenwichvillagenydailyphoto.blogspot.com/2009/04/peter-mcmanus-cafe.html

Peter McManus Café has been a fixture in the neighborhood since1936.  And it continues to draw a crowd of neighborhood folks and auslanders alike from a pack of sharp young lawyers to aging/or aged hippies in overalls, to firemen, or contractors on a neighborhood job, to the odd barfly maintaining a seat on a stool with a certain amount of difficulty.  There are a few women, too, especially at night (read: after 6:00) when bright color and glamour and some intense flirtations enter the bar; but during the day, it seems to be province of men. The place even hosts the out of the way casual customers on their way to the Chelsea galleries, or to the trendy thrift shops in the west 20’s.

The bartender today is a guy whose bushy gray beard and moustache cover the bulk of his face, but he is as warm and genial as his many clean shaven predecessors—probably his father and grandfather.  Joking with everybody, he and his remarks bring snorts and bellows of laughter down the bar even to the corner table where I sit.  The bartender even manages to extend a helping hand to the tippling barfly while pulling generous pints of beer.

McManus does serve mixed drinks, but I saw very few tiny little umbrellas or pink monkeys depending from a glass.  The mixed drinks are very much an afterthought to the fine beer menu which is as long as your arm and begins but does not end with Guinness.  I had a wonderful black and tan- Guinness with lager, which if poured correctly spills into an even split of half black Guinness, half warm golden lager and when you drink it, the two flavors mingle on the tongue.

There’s food, but no fancy chic fusion stuff- –  good basic decent burgers which won applause from my dining companion,  (the chiliburgers are legendary), a giant pile of steak-cut fries, , a few salads which are surprisingly varied and tasty for a meat and potatoes kind of place, and my personal fave, the fennel scented knockwurst and sauerkraut. Smothered with mustard, it was a meal so hearty that I was not hungry until some twelve hours later.

To history starved New Yorkers a bar/restaurant which has survived longer than a season is a rarity; four generations, outstanding and virtually unique.  The bar’s history can be read from its walls.   I sat under a large McManus portrait and at my left hand a foldout picture of Company D, 130th Infantry, where if one could just pick him out was doubtless James J. McManus. No date, but clearly World War II.—we know he served in the Philippines and won two Purple Hearts. I also sat directly in front of a TV playing the Food Channel, tear stained contestants slicing and dicing, running on a loop; and a flashing automated red menu announcing the much touted Goose Island Summer beer. Nostalgia, chic collations, trendy seasonal beer:  All one’s needs taken care of.

Before we left, completely sated, we wanted to check one small niggling detail.  Could the banquette have been covered with red plastic last time we were here? Instead of the current green?  We asked our friendly and convivial waitress..  She sternly told us that nothing of the sort had happened or, would ever happen is she had anything to say about it.  “We don’t change anything much around here at Peter McManus. We like things to stay pretty much the same.”

How could we argue?  A steady port in an unsteady changing world. We felt exactly the same way.

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Peter McManus Café on Urbanspoon

Chili, chili everywhere and not a place to eat – 2011 NYC Chili Fest

BY CAROLYN ONOFREY

Sunday, January 30th, 2011
Chelsea Market
chilifest2011.com

A crowded Chelsea Market the day of Chili Fest

A crowded Chelsea Market the day of Chili Fest

This years’ chili fest got off to a great start with over two dozen restaurants and organizations competing for the Chili Champ of NYC 2011, $2,000, and the golden Chili Mug .

Dickson’s Farmstand Meats provided the competing chefs with locally raised beef for the chilis and musical groups The Dixons and The Ebony Hillbillies provided entertainment to the crowds who quickly became comatose by the large amounts of chili they were consuming.

The winners, Northern Spy Food Co. proudly served their authentic Texas style chili, with beef slow braised in Six Point brews with three kinds of chilies.  The outcome was both hearty and flavorful.

Winners – The Northern Spy Food Co.

Winners – The Northern Spy Food Co.

Other standouts were Roberta’s – with huge chunks of sirloin, Telepan – topped with Mexican cheese, No. 7 – with corn chips and a spicy broccoli puree, and Toloache – a Korean style chili with pickled vegetables served on top.  The Brooklyn Brewery even tried their hand at chili with the “Kitchen Sink” chili, including “every spice known to man.”

Serving chili at Telepan

Serving chili at Telepan

Dauntingly crowded, chili fest was a marathon of chili, one table after the other serving up scoopfuls of chili with barely enough time to finish the chili at hand before you were ushered by the crowd to the next.

Although the event was scheduled to run from 4pm-8pm, most of the chili and beer was gone by 6:30 and vendors, as well as the bands had started to pack up and leave.  Next year, come early!

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Two fabulous takes on Christmas Eve feasting

Two excellent ways to celebrate Christmas Eve sans apron this year:

almond

Almond is located in Manhattan’s Flatiron District. For more information on Christmas Eve at Almond, click on the image above.

COLA’S HOLIDAY MENU

SPECIAL

Sicilian Seven Fishes for

Christmas Eve

($48 + tax +tip)

APPETIZER

GRILLED PORTUGUESE OCTOPUS AND FRESH SARDINES

PASTA

SPAGHETTINI VONGOLE: CLAMS & MUSSELS IN A WHITE WINE SAUCE

ENTRÉE

FRITO MISTO OF LOCAL FILET OF SOLE, JUMBO SHRIMP, AND CALAMARI

DESSERT

CHOICE OF CITRUS ANNESETTE CHEESECAKE

OR

COLA’S TIRAMISU

*INCLUDES A GLASS OF PROSECCO*

Cola is located in the heart of Chelsea on

148 8TH AVENUE (17th & 8th)

(212) 633-8020

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Just another burger – Review of Rare

BY CAROLYN ONOFREY

Rare
152 West 26th Street (Inside Fashion 26 Hotel)
Chelsea
212-807-7273/rarebarandgrill.com

Burger Trio at Rare

Burger Trio at Rare

I was expecting a steakhouse when I heard the name ‘Rare’, but was comfortable with the fact that it also alluded to a burger restaurant.  Located at the foot of the trendy Fashion 26 Hotel, Rare is dressed to impress with a sleek modern design punctuated with humor like the barbed wire motif on the staircase and walls and the huge “EAT” spelled out in knives on the wall of their lower level.

Although new and clearly very nervous, our waitress was friendly and accommodating along with the rest of the very attentive staff at Rare.  My friend Stephanie and I ordered the Parmesan truffle fries ($5) per our waitress’s recommendation, to start.  I was disappointed with my first taste of Rare, the fries seeming stale as if they were sitting under the (not so hot) heat lamp a little too long.  I also couldn’t help but to wonder where all the rich truffle flavor was hiding, or even where the Parmesan flavor was hiding.  I could certainly see the parm, but had a hard time finding the flavor.

Parmesan truffle fries at Rare

Parmesan truffle fries at Rare


I decided I absolutely had to try the Burger Trio ($15), 3 sliders of the chef’s choice to truly experience all that Rare had to offer (at least as much as I could in one meal!).  The trio came with a lightly dressed salad and fries, a good value for what it was.  On the chef’s menu for the night were a pesto mozzarella burger, a caramelized onion and Gruyere, and a bacon cheese burger topped with a tangy, salty Spanish cheese.  The sliders were all surprisingly juicy right in the center of the patty, but the meat and toppings themselves didn’t impress, lacking some much needed punch.  The bacon cheeseburger was my favorite with the thick cut applewood smoked bacon adding a nice crunch and salt factor.
I don’t think I’ll be back to Rare, except maybe to grab a drink on their Rare View rooftop bar with a great view, but I’m glad I tried it out.  With so many burgers in The City, a burger is just a burger until proven great!

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Where to Watch World Cup Soccer Italian Style

Ovest Pizzoteca is featuring a special prix-fixe menu for all
World Cup Soccer games (June 11 – July 11).

ovest

The $16.00 Prix Fixe menu includes:

1 Bufala Pizza, 1 Birra Italiana and 1 Espresso.

Enjoy unlimited pizza for $12 during all Italian national games.

For iNFO & RSVP 212 967 4392 or info@ovestnyc.com or click on the image above to connect to Ovest Pizzoteca’s web site.

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